Bratz dollz
Posted: 21 April 2008 11:34 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Bratz dollz

I do find it sickening that they are pushing this trash on such young children…

The dolls are aimed at 4-8-year-old girls, with “dewy lips, fishnet stockings and barely-there miniskirts — a creep-out factor for a lot of moms. Earlier this year, a report from the American Psychological Assn. even mentioned the Bratz dolls by name and said ‘it is worrisome when dolls designed specifically for 4- to 8-year-olds are associated with an objectified adult sexuality.’ ” So we have the cultural subversion theme going on: “ten-inch tall hoochie mamas” for little girls to play with. Director Sean McNamara’s first reaction to the dolls is revealing: “These aren’t cute dolls — they look like sluts.”

Just What Your First Grader Needs…A Padded Bra

Get your barf bags ready, people. The braintrust that brought the world Bratz dollz are at it again…

Bratz Twin Baby Lingerie Dollz

Bratz Lingerie Twins

Phoebe “Sugar” is dressed in a fluffy pink jacket with pink and black underwear, while Roxxi “Spice” has an open fake leather jacket and skimpy red and black lingerie. Both dolls have baby milk bottles hanging off chains strapped to their legs.

I’m not sure if these things are being sold in the US or not but in Australia, sales are expected to reach one million this year. WTF???

But WAIT! Grab another barf bag. It gets worse…

Target stores in Australia are also selling Bratz and Barbie padded bras for little girls starting at size 6 and if you look at it in the photo below, the first two sets on the left and in the middle are very mature looking. In fact, it’s not unlike lingerie that I own. But it’s for little kids which is just gross.

The padded Bratz “bralettes” were among more than 30 different junior bra styles starting at size six on sale at a city Target store visited by the Herald Sun yesterday.The Australian Family Association warned parents against sexualising their children. “We have a growing problem with pedophilia and people viewing children as sex objects,” spokeswoman Angela Conway said. ~The Herald Sun

GIRLS SIZE 6, people!

http://izzymom.com/2006/09/11/just-what-your-first-grader-needspadded-bras/

Sexy, sassy, still in primary school(more on Bratz)
http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/sexy-sassy-still-in-primary-school/2006/12/22/1166290740883.html


Kevin Macdonald:

Not having any young daughters I was quite unaware of the “wildly successful” Bratz dolls or the recent movie featuring them. (“A Good-Girl Make-Over for the Bratz,” Los Angeles Times, July 30, 2007). The dolls are aimed at 4-8-year-old girls, with “dewy lips, fishnet stockings and barely-there miniskirts — a creep-out factor for a lot of moms. Earlier this year, a report from the American Psychological Assn. even mentioned the Bratz dolls by name and said ‘it is worrisome when dolls designed specifically for 4- to 8-year-olds are associated with an objectified adult sexuality.’ ” So we have the cultural subversion theme going on: “ten-inch tall hoochie mamas” for little girls to play with. Director Sean McNamara’s first reaction to the dolls is revealing: “These aren’t cute dolls — they look like sluts.” (Here’s a collection from Google Images.)

But for the movie, they probably figured that the teenage girls as sluts theme would mean that the girls would actually have to act slutty rather than just look slutty. That would bring about an R-rating or worse, and therefore cut down on the profits. So the hoochie mama theme was downplayed in favor of a strong multicultural conflict between multi-race good guys versus “country club white” bad guys. The bad guys are led by “student-body president Meredith, who is platinum blond, affluent, haughty and in possession of both nefarious plans to rule the school and a pampered pooch named (ahem) Paris.”

On the other hand, the Bratz “are the urban poly-hues of a Benetton ad”: one “lily-white,” one African-American, one Asian, and one Latino (played by the daughter of an Australian Jew and a Spanish Catholic). So there is a Jewish theme as well: “The loopy vision of a Jewish grandmother who, with no explanation, has a mariachi band strumming away and munching on bagels in her kitchen.“The driving force behind Bratz is Avi Arad, an Israeli-American who is very big on diversity, at least for America: “The first thing I saw in them was diversity.” ... “I really liked the idea that they had a Latino girl, an Asian girl, an African American girl and a lily-white kid. They show that your color is not going to set up your path in life. And I think that works because, among kids, it’s becoming more and more of ‘one world for a change.’”

All of the non-white characters look about as white as possible while nevertheless retaining distinctive racial characteristics. This doubtless makes the characters more attractive to white girls who constitute the core audience for the movie. After all, it’s natural to be attracted to those like yourself (part of the deep structure of Philippe Rushton’s Genetic Similarity Theory)— even when the ingroup crosses racial lines. Having a dark-skinned Muslim character dressed in a Burkha would definitely ruin the aura.

http://www.kevinmacdonald.net/Blog.htm#Bratz


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bratz

And on related note: “Miss Bimbo,” a new internet game, aimed at girls aged 9 to 16…

Miss Bimbo website promotes extreme diets and surgery to 9-year-olds
The internet game, aimed at girls aged 9 to 16, gives users ‘bimbo dollars’ to buy lingerie, diet pills and nightclub outfits. It has attracted 200,000 UK members

A website that encourages girls as young as 9 to embrace plastic surgery and extreme dieting in the search for the perfect figure was condemned as lethal by parents’ groups and healthcare experts yesterday.

The Miss Bimbo internet game has attracted prepubescent girls who are told to buy their virtual characters breast enlargement surgery and to keep them “waif thin” with diet pills.

Healthcare professionals, a parents’ group and an organisation representing people suffering anorexia and bulimia criticised the website for sending a dangerous message to impressionable children.


http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/the_web/article3613881.ece

Also see:

Kinism Forum: Strawberry Shortcake and Dora the Explorer get Bratz style makeovers.

[ Edited: 02 October 2009 12:09 AM by Faust ]
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Posted: 22 April 2008 12:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Those dolls and games you mention embody sheer nastiness, and cultural subversion to boot.

My personal preference for dolls are the dolls designed in what is called the Waldorf style. I can’t speak authoritatively about the religious theories of Rudolf Steiner, from whose philosophies the toys were designed, however the dolls are soft, nurturing-looking, made of natural materials. Quite sweet and non-threatening.

Here are some online sources for these kind of dolls and other Waldorf-style toys.

http://www.joyswaldorfdolls.com/

http://www.threesisterstoys.com/

http://www.hazelnutkids.com/

http://www.waldorftreasures.com/

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 22 April 2008 12:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Laurel,

Hello. Yes, those Waldorf dolls do look like nice toys for little ladies. I have sometimes wondered if there was not some virtue in the porcelain doll. Little girls used to carry and care for these dolls for years without breaking them, one wonders if they did not gain a bit responsibility and maturity from them. There are a number of good things one can say about Rudolf Steiner, but I am not sure quite how he should be judged in such context overall. Something for me to think about this week.

[ Edited: 22 April 2008 01:29 PM by Faust ]
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Posted: 22 April 2008 07:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Faust - 22 April 2008 12:44 AM

Laurel,
I have sometimes wondered if there was not some virtue in the porcelain doll. Little girls used to carry and care for these dolls for years without breaking them, one wonders if they did not gain a bit responsibility and maturity from them.

If one would like to purchase a real 1850s style porcelain doll, then sew her period-correct outfits (free patterns on the web site), go to http://www.elizabethstewartclark.com/DC/index.htm. Not inexpensive, but truly lovely.

After a brief perusal of some of the sites which offer reproductions of antique porcelain dolls, I must say I prefer the looks of the Waldorf dolls to the somewhat intimidating faces of the later 1800s porcelain dolls. The only one I really like is the 1850s one I have linked to above.

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 27 December 2009 05:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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On related note the origins of Barbie are not very nice…

The Bild Lilli Doll was a German fashion doll produced from 1955 to 1964, based on the comic-strip character Lilli. She is the predecessor of Barbie.

In the beginning Lilli was a German cartoon character, created by Reinhard Beuthien for the tabloid Bild-Zeitung in Hamburg, Germany. In 1953 the Bild-Zeitung decided to market a Lilli doll and contacted Max Weissbrodt from the toy company O&M Hausser in Neustadt/Coburg, Germany. Following Beuthien’s drawings Weissbrodt designed the prototype of the doll which was on sale from 1955 to 1964 when Mattel acquired the rights to the doll so the German production had to stop...

Reinhard Beuthien was ordered to make a “filler” to conceal a blank space in the Bild-Zeitung of June 24, 1952. He drew a cute baby, but his boss didn’t like it. So he kept the face, added a ponytail and a curvy woman’s body and called his creation “Lilli”. She sat in a fortune-teller’s tent asking: “Can’t you tell me the name and address of this rich and handsome man?” The cartoon was an immediate success so Beuthien had to draw new ones each day.

Lilli was sassy and ambitious and had no reservations talking about sex. As she had her own job she earned her own money as a secretary but wasn’t above hanging out with rich men (“I could do without balding old men but my budget couldn’t!”). The cartoon always consisted of a picture of Lilli talking to girlfriends, boyfriends, her boss (“As you were angry when I was late this morning I will leave the office at five p.m. sharp!”). The quips underneath the cartoons handled topics ranging from fashion (to a policeman who told her that two-piece-swimsuits are banned: “Which piece do you want me to take off?”), politics (“Of course I’m interested in politics; no one should ignore the way some politicians dress!”) and even the beauty of nature (“The sunrise is so beautiful that I always stay late at the nightclub to see it!”). The last Lilli cartoon appeared on January 5, 1961…


She was originally marketed to adults in bars and tobacco shops as a joke or gag gift. Many parents considered her not appropriate for children. Ariel Levy refers to her as a “sex doll” in Female Chauvinist Pigs. A German brochure from the 1950s states that Lilli was “always discreet,” and that her wardrobe made her “the star of every bar.” Although the doll was originally not designed as a children’s toy, she eventually became popular with children. Dollshouses, room settings, furniture and other toy accessories to scale with the small Lilli were produced by German toy factories to cash in with her popularity amongst children…

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