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Agrarian and Homesteading How-to’s
Posted: 10 March 2008 11:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Some Canning links…

Homecanning.com
http://www.homecanning.com/

The National Center for Home Food Preservation
http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/

USDA Canning Guide (1994)
http://foodsafety.psu.edu/canningguide.html

How to Can, Freeze, Dry and Preserve Any Fruit or Vegetable at Home
http://www.pickyourown.org/allaboutcanning.htm

Home Canning and Freezing
http://www.paulnoll.com/Oregon/Canning/

Canning Recipes for Preserving Food
http://www.canning-food-recipes.com/

Canning Supplies, Canning Equipment
http://www.canningpantry.com/

[ Edited: 15 March 2008 11:26 PM by Faust ]
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Posted: 15 March 2008 11:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Two very active Yahoo groups with excellent information on preparedness, the agrarian lifestyle (although not specifically defined as such), etc. are:

misc_survivalism_moderated http://groups.yahoo.com/group/misc_survivalism_moderated/

“This list is for those who want themselves and their loved ones to survive and prosper during hard times.
War, riots, famine, crime, drought, flooding, fire, contaminated water supplies, inflation, job loss, and many more.
Are you ready to deal with any situation?
Join us as we learn from each other how to survive.”

and

preparedsurvivalistsunite2 http://groups.yahoo.com/group/preparedsurvivalistsunite2/

“Current events sends a message that we need to take care of ourselves. Families need to be proactive and learn preparedness.
From canning, caching, to bug-out retreats. War, famine, unemployment, health, weather related, we need to prepare. We are here to help.
We talk about survival related topics to the erosion of our constitutional rights in this group. Flaming is not allowed, period. Also, we are homeschool friendly. “

I’ve read these lists off and on for years and garnered much useful information from them.

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 15 March 2008 11:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I’ve always wanted to garden without much work…unfortunately the work keeps finding me…and the weeds have my number on speed dial…

Square Foot Gardening sounds good to me. Perhaps I should try it next.

“The Official Site of Square Foot Gardening and Mel Bartholomew, Originator and Author
No Work, Organic Gardening the Square Foot Way
How would you like a garden filled with beautiful flowers, fresh herbs and luscious vegetables, but NO WEEDS and NO HARD WORK?”

http://www.squarefootgardening.com/

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 16 March 2008 04:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Backwoodsman Magazine


The Backwoodsman magazine is a bi-monthly publication dedicated to the
preservation of Old Frontier living, primitive hunting and fishing, tool and weapons
lore, and wilderness survival. Each issue is packed with information, projects
and adventures associated with this unique period of North American history.

- How to build shelter, canoes, firearms, bow-and-arrows and more…
- How to fabricate clothing, create tools and other gear necessary for life on the frontier…
- Survival techniques, fire-building, cooking…
- Primitive hunting and fishing…
- Indian lore…

Biblical Ararianism.com

Countryside Magazine and Small Stock Journal

Countryside & Small Stock Journal (better known as just “Countryside”) is more than a magazine: it’s a network where homesteaders share a wide variety of experiences and ideas about simple, sustainable, country living.

There are no guidelines and no paid writers. Instead, there is an open atmosphere of neighborly sharing.

Major, more-or-less regular departments are patterned on a walking tour of an “ideal” or composite homestead that goes something like this:

We’ll meet you at the front gate and exchange brief ideas and comments in Country Conversation.

Then, depending on the weather and season, we might stroll through The Garden, inspect The Beehive, and take a look at the Henhouse and Rabbitry. We’ll visit The Sheep Shed and The Goat Barn, The Pig Pen and The Family Cow.

On some homesteads we might see rare, exotic, or new breeds: Miniature, Devon, or Scotch Highland cattle, for instance, or perhaps fallow deer or emus. On others the highlight of the tour might be The Greenhouse, the wind or solar power installation or other forms of Alternative Energy, or The Root Cellar.

In most cases we’ll visit The Workshop, where we might learn how to build a solar oven, a pea sheller or a high-quality food dryer-or how to repair or even make a tool or part such as an ax handle.

We’ll discuss such topics as Home Business, Home Schooling, and home health care or Alternative Medicine.

Back in The Country Kitchen we’ll enjoy a bit of hospitality-and recipe sharing, including canning, freezing, drying and root cellaring hints.

While the bread dough is rising we’ll probably pick up some new ideas on recycling, conservation, or ways to save a little money-or to use it more wisely.

We’ll also visit other Country Neighbors all across the country (and sometimes beyond), hearing and seeing-in their own words and pictures-what they’re doing and how they’re doing it.

And finally, After Chores, maybe sitting on the porch swing on a warm summer evening or around the woodstove on a wintry one, we’ll discuss all those things that seem to crop up when good neighbors get together-as long as they fit Our Philosophy which appears in every issue.

A classic: Foxfire Series

On energy: Home Power

For blacksmiths: Anvilfire.com

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Posted: 16 March 2008 06:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Welcome, DanielJ!

Thanks for contributing valuable information to this topic. We’re looking forward to more input from you in the future.

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 16 March 2008 07:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I’m working my way out of the city now toward my five acres and independence.

I will be sure to post anything valuable that I find in my quest to “get off the grid” and live a life that is more natural and glorifying to God. I’ve got quite a few of my own ideas as well that I will be posting on my blog after I’ve had a chance to do some more research.

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Posted: 16 March 2008 07:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Also, I’m not sure where Mr. Salatin’s theology lies (although I’m pretty sure it isn’t anywhere near as “rightward” as our own) he claims to be a brother and is a powerful advocate for many of the agrarian ideas we espouse.

Polyface Farms

Men that are interested in farming and have a year at their disposal (I repeat: males only) can spend it on Joel’s farm doing an apprenticeship.

Mr. Salatin is very successful and a good model for us as far as I can tell. He is written about extensively in The Omnivore’s Dilemma  in addition to having his own books titled Salad Bar Beef, Family Friendly Farming, Holy Cows and Hog Heaven and most interestingly, Everything I Want to do is Illegal: War Stories from the Local Food Front.

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Posted: 03 April 2008 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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This site is worth looking at too:

http://www.frugalsquirrels.com/

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Posted: 12 April 2008 01:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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The blog this post is taken from is very interesting…not necessarily politically or philosophically in tune with Kinism, but the society-building mechanisms he talks about would certainly be workable in building small or “micro” communities. Found the blog via a comment link over at Majority Rights.

http://globalguerrillas.typepad.com/globalguerrillas/

Thursday, 10 April 2008
RESILIENT COMMUNITY: MICROGRIDS

Electricity is the lifeblood of modernity, but it is going to become much more expensive (fuel expense/availability) and unavailable (due to an increase in random failures via underinvestment to a plethora of black swan scenarios). As such, communities need to gain control over the flows of electricity in order to become resilient. One of the first steps towards this goal is through the concept of the Microgrid. Here’s some background reading from the CERTS (Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions). Essentially it is a local power network connected to the national/regional grid through a smart switch.

Why the Microgrid?
There’s been lots of exploration at the national level on incorporating computing architectures (data services plus sensors) into the grid system (known under the rubric “the Smart Grid”). Unfortunately, these efforts suffer from the step function problem. This means that the changes contemplated are too expensive and too wrenching to accomplish on a large scale (akin to boiling the ocean). The only way to implement these new technologies and methods is to find a way to do it organically. The Microgrid enables this by creating a local network (electricity plus data services) that can become a platform for the organic growth of a diverse and innovative ecosystem of solutions and providers.

What it Does
A Microgrid enables the ability to do the following:

  * to disconnect from the national grid when there is a general utility failure. This enables a combination of back-up power systems from third party providers—everything from flywheels to back-up generators (very much the same approach that data-centers use).
  * to build a local market for power production. Since the Microgrid buys power in volume from the national grid, it will likely get dynamic pricing data (time of day, etc.). This data allows the Microgrid to offer local producers of electricity the ability to sell into the Microgrid at competitive prices (peer to peer production). Of course, if local power production is a priority, then the price comparison can be weighted via subsidies to favor local producers.
  * to add smart features that will only get nominal deployment on the national grid. For example, the ability to add smarts to devices and homes to allow customers to manage their consumption of electricity at a granular level—from price to device.

WIM (what it means)

It’s important to point out that Microgrid technology and processes have applicability to:

  * Counter-insurgency. Even though tens of billions of dollars have been invested in the reconstruction of Iraq, we still can’t keep the lights on in Baghdad. Microgrids could make this possible.
  * Development. Microgrids provide a mechanism for organic growth in developing economies plagued by badly functioning national grids.
  * Competitive advantage. Communities that get this right (high availability power that is also very clean), will gain a competitive edge in competing for residents and business flow. The pay-off is higher home values and better/more jobs.

Posted by John Robb on Thursday, 10 April 2008 at 07:31 AM

DanielJ, you are familiar with electrical systems, what do you think of this idea? How would it work? How could it switch off of the larger grid? Does anyone have any ideas as to how a data network (like an intranet?) could exist on a basis where access to the larger internet could be switched on or off as needed?

I’ve highlighted some things in blue that I thought were important.

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 12 April 2008 02:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Laurel,

Hello, I am cannot claim to be an expert on such subject, but I am not sure if building a miro power grind is the most cost effective use of resources. We can live with a lot less electrically than we normally use. We do need to think about how prepare to make do without some things. Windmills, batteries, and small generators will all play a role in such plans.

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Posted: 12 April 2008 02:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Laurel,

Amateur radio (ham radio) could be used connect to internet or even form a private network; data could be shared over distances of thousands of miles. I fear I do not know enough to go into any detail on this topic.  Cells phones, satellite phones, and telephone lines if available could be used to transfer date or connect to the internet, but the cost would be high.

Laurel Loflund - 12 April 2008 01:59 AM

Does anyone have any ideas as to how a data network (like an intranet?) could exist on a basis where access to the larger internet could be switched on or off as needed?

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Posted: 12 April 2008 11:19 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Faust,

I’m a data/computer guy by trade, and there are community intranets springing up all over as municipalities move toward providing universal internet availability as a “utility”, similar to the way that they provide and maintain the local road system (with generous grants from the state and Fed). While from a political standpoint this is simply another income redistribution scheme (the impetus being that the “performance gap” can be solved by providing blacks and hispanics with free municipal internet), it does show that community intranets are more than feasible.

The micro grid idea is not a bad one, but it would be very costly and difficult to maintain. I agree that for the time being, we should focus on other things. The issue at hand is that Kinists, for the most part, are a distributed bunch. This is not a bad thing at the current time, as we’ve all seen what happens to culturally/religiously secessionist “compounds”.

Rather than compounds, we should be thinking about how we form communities. There are two paths: one is the “build it where you are” path, which is more achievable in the long run, and has the benefit of being a distributed network (this is what Kinism.net exists for). The other path is the “build it and they will come” path. While this has its own advantages, such as being able to coop farm among other things, it is more vulnerable since it is a “point on the map” solution that is easily targeted by “authorities”. At the least little provocation, they will swarm your community and accuse you of child abuse or some such nonsense. They don’t do this with the Amish because there are too many of them and they are pacifist and largely politically inactive.

For the time being, I think it is more easily achievable, and a better near term solution to have the distributed kind of community. To that end, we can talk about the role that HAM radio can play in that. The agricultural and other advice we exchange here in the forums is invaluable in supporting a distributed community. I think it is a mistake to dogmatically rule out high tech solutions if they are sustainable. But sustainability is difficult to achieve in technologies that were produced by the massive, industrial division-of-labor system that underlies modern life in the U.S. We should, still,be looking at sustainable technologies that can improve productivity in farming and enable home-based entrepreneurship.

A wind farm is a possibly sustainable technology that would apply itself to a micro-grid. In some parts of the country, micro-hydroelectric is also a possibility for “cooperative” power supplies. I think we would all agree that “some” electrification is a definite benefit.

Also, I’d like everyone to know that I operate a virtual private server on a not-for-profit basis to have the capacity to host white-run, racially aware websites that are under threat of being taken off of the internet by over-zealous ISPs and hosting companies. You can inquire with me about a hosting account if you operate a website currently.  It would be free or nearly free of cost.

[ Edited: 12 April 2008 11:24 AM by W.M. Godfrey ]
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Posted: 12 April 2008 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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John Marshall,

Compounds are also a bit socialistic for the nature of society we want live in anyway. The Puritans when they first came to New England lived in communal way and did not like it very much. The FLDS community is Arizona an incorporated city with public roads and dozens of homes and businesses, so the state is much less able to bother them. The state would have to get a search warrant for each house. The state of Texas got search warrant that allowed them to search the whole town built on the ranch. This sect’s Texas settlement plan to give themselves more privacy has proven to be a bad idea.

John Marshall - 12 April 2008 11:19 AM

Rather than compounds, we should be thinking about how we form communities. There are two paths: one is the “build it where you are” path, which is more achievable in the long run, and has the benefit of being a distributed network (this is what Kinism.net exists for). The other path is the “build it and they will come” path. While this has its own advantages, such as being able to coop farm among other things, it is more vulnerable since it is a “point on the map” solution that is easily targeted by “authorities”. At the least little provocation, they will swarm your community and accuse you of child abuse or some such nonsense. They don’t do this with the Amish because there are too many of them and they are pacifist and largely politically inactive.

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Posted: 12 April 2008 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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John Marshall - 12 April 2008 11:19 AM

Faust,

I’m a data/computer guy by trade, and there are community intranets springing up all over as municipalities move toward providing universal internet availability as a “utility”, similar to the way that they provide and maintain the local road system (with generous grants from the state and Fed). While from a political standpoint this is simply another income redistribution scheme (the impetus being that the “performance gap” can be solved by providing blacks and hispanics with free municipal internet), it does show that community intranets are more than feasible.

The possibility of these networks existing was one of the things I garnered from the Global Guerillas post; but what surprised me there was the “smart switch” idea, i.e., that if things were going badly on the internet in general, or with electrical supplies in general, a town (I am not a fan of the compound model, for obvious reasons) could simply switch over to providing their own electric (if folks had been diligent in building local infrastructure of whatever sort) in addition to disconnecting the intranet from the greater internet. That last, of course, would require that valuable internet resources from the outside world be mirrored in some way in the smaller intranet world.

The internet as a tool is too valuable, IMHO, for everything from education to communication, to disregard. I am certainly open to the HAM radio idea, but it’s hard to deliver curriculum over HAM radio.

The micro grid idea is not a bad one, but it would be very costly and difficult to maintain. I agree that for the time being, we should focus on other things. The issue at hand is that Kinists, for the most part, are a distributed bunch….Rather than compounds, we should be thinking about how we form communities. There are two paths: one is the “build it where you are” path, which is more achievable in the long run, and has the benefit of being a distributed network (this is what Kinism.net exists for).

Where I am is smack dab in the midst of the invasion; on the front lines. Every day I watch my culture being overwhelmed in so many different ways as to make it difficult to combat. So the build it where you are option is not practical for me; in my case, once I am able to retire from my job, it will have to be “build it where I can retire to.” Or, if it gets too bad here, a distinct possibility, build it somewhere I can bug out to.

The other path is the “build it and they will come” path. While this has its own advantages, such as being able to coop farm among other things, it is more vulnerable since it is a “point on the map” solution that is easily targeted by “authorities”. At the least little provocation, they will swarm your community and accuse you of child abuse or some such nonsense. They don’t do this with the Amish because there are too many of them and they are pacifist and largely politically inactive.

Not to mention the fact that the Amish are picturesque and make good tourism draws. I’ve thought about this a fair bit; as in many things in American life, they will leave you alone if they can a) point at you and say “oooh, pretty!” and b) make a buck off of you by driving busses full of gawking tourists through the area.

But’s that’s neither here nor there. I am not ponying up to wearing “plain” clothes just yet.

I do believe, as I think you do, John, that any community we build would be safer by not being exclusive to Kinists (a variation on the distributed model); which is why the old factory/farm town idea has some appeal to me. Typically the remaining population in these places is white and politically inert enough to not seem (or be, to be honest) a threat to the powers-that-be. Actually, Kinists are most likely not a threat to the powers-that-be because we are a small group and mostly just want to be left alone. But they won’t think that about us.

For the time being, I think it is more easily achievable, and a better near term solution to have the distributed kind of community. To that end, we can talk about the role that HAM radio can play in that. The agricultural and other advice we exchange here in the forums is invaluable in supporting a distributed community.

Having forums to share information with each other rests on the basis of having a working electrical grid and the internet infrastructure so we can actually do that. Hence my interest in finding ways to preserve both, either in small communities or as part of the larger world. Frankly, I don’t have an answer as to how to maintain it in the larger world if the larger world deteriorates while we are yet part of it.

I think it is a mistake to dogmatically rule out high tech solutions if they are sustainable. But sustainability is difficult to achieve in technologies that were produced by the massive, industrial division-of-labor system that underlies modern life in the U.S. We should, still,be looking at sustainable technologies that can improve productivity in farming and enable home-based entrepreneurship.

A wind farm is a possibly sustainable technology that would apply itself to a micro-grid. In some parts of the country, micro-hydroelectric is also a possibility for “cooperative” power supplies. I think we would all agree that “some” electrification is a definite benefit.

I suppose solar panels and a grid-free lifestyle as much as possible would be another possibility. And where sun is abundant, if such a home is producing power over and above its needs, it can contribute power to the overall grid, or a microgrid if such a thing exists locally. But I am not exactly what one might call an expert on this; I’ve read a few articles, that’s all. But any of these power producing technologies rest on a functioning technological society because if it’s not functioning you can’t buy replacement panels when something goes wrong with yours…

Also, I’d like everyone to know that I operate a virtual private server on a not-for-profit basis to have the capacity to host white-run, racially aware websites that are under threat of being taken off of the internet by over-zealous ISPs and hosting companies. You can inquire with me about a hosting account if you operate a website currently.  It would be free or nearly free of cost.

Praise God for you, John, and your devotion to our cause. I’d give you a hug if we weren’t so durn “distributed.”

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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Posted: 12 April 2008 02:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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While I am no fan of the Transcendental Meditation movement, I am aware that the group moved into a small, failing college (Parsons) in a dying farm/college town (Fairfield, Iowa) in the 1970s and have successfully remade the college and town in their image, so to speak.

Looking at the web pages linked at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairfield,_Iowa gives one the impression that a certain amount of dedication to a place (one might say obssessiveness) as well as a philosophy can revitalize a dying town.

God bless,
Laurel

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Deo Volente, Deo Vindice.

God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. Heb. 6:10

“Victory is won not in miles but in inches. Win a little now, hold your ground, and later, win a little more.”– Louis L’Amour

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